Amber Hamilton: Towards the Future of Arts Philanthropy

Amber Hamilton, Arts Impact Charlotte
January 30, 2021 - 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM
Virtual - Zoom

The UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture and Arts Impact Charlotte present a conversation with Amber Hamilton, Executive Director of the Memphis Music Initiative. She will present "Towards the Future of Arts Philanthropy: The Disruptive Vision of MMI," followed by a public discussion facilitated by Nikkeia Lee, Managing Director of The Possibility Project - Charlotte. This event is FREE and open to the public, but registration is required.

Register here to receive the Zoom link.


Memphis Music Initiative (MMI) invests in youth through transformative music engagement, creating equitable opportunities for black and brown youth in Memphis, Tennessee, as both a direct service provider and a community funder. Since 2016, MMI has given more than $3 million, thousands of hours of consultation, led more than 40 cohort learning convenings, and most importantly, demonstrated that equity and trust-based philanthropy can be successful for grantmakers and grantees. MMI’s approach is inclusive and asset-based, shedding the conventional and highly exclusive philanthropic requirements for accessing funding, supports, or even a seat at the table.

Executive Director Amber Hamilton is a seasoned leader, coach, and trainer with extensive experience in leadership strategies and nonprofit management.

Arts Impact Charlotte is an initiative led by a collaborative of local artists and designers, arts advocates, and researchers. Among its goals are:

  • To present a new narrative regarding the arts and design and their roles in addressing challenges in our city and region
  • To establish creative practitioners as important contributors and decision-makers in Charlotte
  • To build an arts community that serves as a model for inclusivity and collaboration
  • To discover new approaches for funding, particularly to the benefit of grassroots and underrepresented groups

This event is funded by a Chancellor's Mini Diversity Grant.